Religious

Lord, Let Me Know What Is My End

I wrote and recorded this song in Niamey, Niger, back in 2012. It is based on Psalm 39.

Lyrics:

Lord, let me know
What is my end
That I might see
That life is short

A strong wind blows
From east to west
So go men’s souls
Drifting away

I need your hand
I need your grace
That I might stand
And see your face

Lord, let me know
My end is near
That I might see
How fleeting is life

For every man is but a breath
That passes by and is no more

I need your hand
I need your grace
That I might stand
And see your face

Lord, let me know
What is my end
That I might see
How small I am

Like leaves that fall
Are the deeds of man
Formed in glory
Then cast away

Oh Lord, my God
You are my King
So I will sing
And hymn my God

Glory to God, King of kings
Glory be to the King of kings, yeah

Lord, let me know
What is my end
That I might see
How great You are
How great You are
How great You are

© 2021, Mark R. Adams. All rights reserved.

“The Old Year Now Away Has Fled”

Set to the tune of Greensleeves, “The Old Year Now Away Is Fled” dates to as early as 1642. It was a common practice, then, to set new lyrics to familiar melodies, and Greensleeves, which dates to the 1500s, was a popular melody. The version I present retains the chord structure of the tune, but the melody is new.

It was recorded using GarageBand and its built-in instruments.

Here’s another version:

Most people think of Greensleeves as a Christmas carol, but originally it was a romance: “Alas, my love, you do me wrong, to cast me off discourteously.” (See my version at the bottom of the post.) In 1865, William Chatterton Dix wrote a poem called “The Manger Throne,” and shortly after its publication, someone set three stanzas of the poem to the tune of Greensleeves. “What Child Is This?” remains a popular carol to this day.

“The Old Year Now Away Is Fled” is both religious and festive. Some lines relate the story of Christ, others champion the right of friends to imbibe “good liquor.”

Continue reading…

© 2020 – 2021, Mark R. Adams. All rights reserved.

Easter Sunrise Service – April 15, 2001

This may have been the first shared service of Mountain Bible Church and Christ Child Catholic Church, a tradition that continued until the days of Covid. I sang Johnny Cash’s Redemption. At the time, I did not play guitar, so Don Strand accompanied me. Later, I would learn the song on guitar.

In 2012, I recorded a version in Central African Republic:

© 2001 – 2021, Mark R. Adams. All rights reserved.